What We’re Reading | Serafina’s Promise by Ann E. Burg | Grade Level: 5 & up
Here at the Weekly Writing Workshop, we love to encourage our students to read. Our weekly Wednesday post What We’re Reading highlights a recommended YA book with diverse representation.

What We’re Reading | Serafina’s Promise by Ann E. Burg | Grade Level: 5 & up

Here at the Weekly Writing Workshop, we love to encourage our students to read. Our weekly Wednesday post What We’re Reading highlights a recommended YA book with diverse representation.

Exercise the writing muscle every day, even if it is only a letter, notes, a title list, a character sketch, a journal entry. Writers are like dancers, like athletes. Without that exercise, the muscles seize up.

Jane Yolen (via maxkirin)

If this is the case I guess I do write every day, I’m always writing long emails (for work or to friends) or jotting down thoughts or bits of stories or editing or writing posts on here. Why do we beat ourselves up for doing anything but writing new words of a story?

(via yeahwriters)

(via yeahwriters)

teachnologies:

What an Effective Teacher’s Classroom Looks Like
This isn’t the most surprisingly list persay, but it’s interesting to see everything laid out. Here are a few from the effective teacher portion of the list:


Lessons are inviting and exciting.
The students do most of the talking and the doing, prompted by the teacher’s questioning and guidance.
Routines and procedures are evident. Students know exactly what is expected of them.
There are no teacher warnings for student misbehavior. If a rule is broken, a consequence follows. If a procedure isn’t followed, the teacher provides more practice.



Tips for new Chapter Coordinators!

teachnologies:

What an Effective Teacher’s Classroom Looks Like

This isn’t the most surprisingly list persay, but it’s interesting to see everything laid out. Here are a few from the effective teacher portion of the list:

  • Lessons are inviting and exciting.
  • The students do most of the talking and the doing, prompted by the teacher’s questioning and guidance.
  • Routines and procedures are evident. Students know exactly what is expected of them.
  • There are no teacher warnings for student misbehavior. If a rule is broken, a consequence follows. If a procedure isn’t followed, the teacher provides more practice.

Tips for new Chapter Coordinators!

(via girlwithalessonplan)

diversityinya:

My hope is that my own books and other books in this genre will grow more and more diverse in the coming years, drawing on little-known cultures to expand the worldview of all readers. I hope to be able to pay homage to my Latina heritage, as well as the other cultures in my blood, in future novels I write. But more than that, I hope to tell many stories about different kinds of people, not just the people I know best. After all, how can I grow as a writer—or a person—if I never venture out of my comfort zone?”

Author Stephanie Diaz (Extraction) at Latin@s in Kid Lit

In my view, a writer is a writer because even when there is no hope, even when nothing you do shows any sign of promise, you keep writing anyway.

Junot Díaz (via writersrelief)

What We’re Reading | The Great Wall of Lucy Wu by Wendy Wan-Long Shang | Grade Level: 4 & up
Here at the Weekly Writing Workshop, we love to encourage our students to read. Our weekly Wednesday post What We’re Reading highlights a recommended YA book with diverse representation. 


What We’re Reading 
The Great Wall of Lucy Wu by Wendy Wan-Long Shang | Grade Level: 4 & up

Here at the Weekly Writing Workshop, we love to encourage our students to read. Our weekly Wednesday post What We’re Reading highlights a recommended YA book with diverse representation. 

As mentioned last week, we taught poetry for this first time this past semester. One thing we didn’t cover extensively was how you can get creative with not just the words on the page, but where you place them. I finally read Crank (I know, 10 years late) and I love how Ellen Hopkins laid out these poems based on their topics. These are just a few of my favorites! 

As mentioned last week, we taught poetry for this first time this past semester. One thing we didn’t cover extensively was how you can get creative with not just the words on the page, but where you place them. I finally read Crank (I know, 10 years late) and I love how Ellen Hopkins laid out these poems based on their topics. These are just a few of my favorites!